Chick-fil-A is the most popular drive-thru service – but the slowest


The restaurant ranked # 1 in an annual study for accuracy, customer service, and taste – but not for speed.

ATLANTA – Slowly but surely, the race is winning, according to a new study testing drive-through services from some of the most popular fast food restaurants.

Chick-fil-A is said to be the most popular drive-thru service, but also the slowest. The restaurant ranked # 1 for accuracy, customer service, and taste – but not speed.

This information came from the drive-thru study for quick service restaurants, an annual industry report from market research company SeeLevel HX. The study examines nationwide transit services. QSR has published this study for the past 10 years, so Food & Wine.

Fast food chains like Dunkin, McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Burger King, KFC, Arby’s, and Wendy’s were reviewed June 29 through August 12 for this year’s study.

KFC, McDonald’s and Taco Bell were faster in 2020 than in 2019 according to the latest data. In 2020, the average total time for a drive-in experience is 356.8 seconds. Back in 2019, this average was 327.0 seconds.

The average cost of a meal is estimated at $ 6.83.

The study also showed how restaurant chains reacted to customers during the pandemic. power Benchmarks including contactless services, COVID-19 precautions, standards compliance and customer trust.

The review found that employees were more likely to use masks than wearing gloves. According to the study, it was rare for a customer to wear gloves when employees wore gloves

The study also looked at when restaurants had a sign at the ordering station with their goals for the safety of customers and employees. 77% of restaurants didn’t.

Locations in the Pacific region (AK, CA, HI, OR, WA) were the most likely to have safety signs, while locations in the West North Central division (IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, SD) were the least likely.

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